ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Impact of Underground Coal Mining on Regional Landscape Pattern Change Based on Life Cycle: A Case Study in Peixian, China
Jiaxing Xu 1, 2  
,  
Hua Zhao 2  
,  
Pengcheng Yin 3  
,  
Naishun Bu 4  
,  
Gang Li 2  
 
 
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1
The National and Local Joint Engineering Laboratory of Internet Applied Technology on Mines, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, China
2
Key Laboratory for Land Environment and Disaster Monitoring of National Administration of Surveying, Mapping and Geoinformation, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, China
3
Bureau of Natural Resources and Planning of Xuzhou, Xuzhou, China
4
School of Environmental Science, Liaoning University, Shenyang, China
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Gang Li   

Key Laboratory for Land Environment and Disaster Monitoring of National Administration of Surveying, Mapping and Geoinformation, China University of Mining and Technology, No1,Daxue Road,Xuzhou,Jiangsu,221116,P.R.China, 221116 Xuzhou, China
Online publish date: 2019-06-25
Publish date: 2019-09-17
Submission date: 2018-09-28
Final revision date: 2018-10-31
Acceptance date: 2018-11-07
 
Pol. J. Environ. Stud. 2019;28(6):4455–4465
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ABSTRACT
Landscape pattern change (LPC) can provide comprehensive insight into the effects of mining activities on regional ecosystems. This paper examined the impact of coal mining on LPC of Peixian mining area, China. An analysis of LPC was conducted based on GIS-RS technology from 1994 to 2014. The influence of coal mining on the LPC was studied quantitatively from the perspective of life cycle. The following conclusions were drawn:
1) The LPC of the study area changed significantly during the study period. Landscape type index showed a rising trend in fluctuation, and landscape fractal characteristics tended to be simplified and regularized.
2) Landscape indices of cultivated land and waterlogged subsidence zones were highly correlated with annual coal production, and the correlation coefficients were -0.634, -0.748 and 0.991, respectively.
3) The abrupt changes of largest patch index (LPI) and aggregation index (AI) of cultivated land occurred in 1999 and 2001, respectively. The LPI of waterlogged subsidence zones had a sustained upward trend since 1995, but the AI had a significant rising trend in 1997-2006 and 2011-2013.
These results could provide useful guidance on sustainable land use planning and restoring the damaged landscape for underground coal mining areas.
eISSN:2083-5906
ISSN:1230-1485