ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Sorption of Aqueous Methylene Blue, Cadmium and Lead onto Biochars Derived from Scrap Papers
Xuebin Xu 1
,  
Xin Hu 2
,  
Zhuhong Ding 1, 3  
,  
Bin Gao 3  
 
 
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1
School of Environmental Science & Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, 30 Puzhu Southern Road, Nanjing 211816, P.R. China
2
State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Center of Material Analysis and School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093, P.R. China
3
Agricultural & Biological Engineering Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Zhuhong Ding   

School of Environmental Science & Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, 30 Puzhu Southern Road, 211816, Nanjing, China
Online publication date: 2020-06-10
Publication date: 2020-08-05
Submission date: 2019-12-08
Final revision date: 2020-03-05
Acceptance date: 2020-03-07
 
Pol. J. Environ. Stud. 2020;29(6):4409–4423
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ABSTRACT
Biochars made from scrap newspaper and book paper (NPBx and BPBx, x represents pyrolysis temperature, ºC) were characterized and used to remove methylene blue (MB), cadmium(Cd(II)) and lead (Pb(II)) from water solution. BPBx had higher yield, C content, and ash content and lower Ca content than NPBx made at the same temperature. Calcite and pyrophyllite were main minerals in NPBx and BPBx, respectively. Biochars made at higher temperature had higher pHpzc values (6.9~11.0). The sorption kinetics of the three pollutants fit pseudo-second model well (R2 = 0.991~0.999). NPB300 and NPB450 had the largest Langmuir sorption capacity of about 23 mg g-1 for MB, while BPB600 had the capacity of 19.5 mg g-1. NPB600 had the largest Langmuir sorption capacity of 13.8 mg g-1 for Cd(II) and 451 mg g-1 for Pb(II). Column sorption capacities were 13.2 mg g-1 (NPB300) and 9.46 mg g-1 (NPB450) for MB and 7.39 mg g-1 (NPB600) for Cd(II). De-ashed BPBx had greater sorption capacity for MB than pristine BPBx. Deposition caused by reaction with CaCO3 was the main reason for Pb(II) sorption by NPB600. Scrap newspaper biochars derived at high temperatures were efficient sorbents for the removal of Pb(II).
eISSN:2083-5906
ISSN:1230-1485