ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Effects of Nutrition on Wheat Photosynthetic Pigment Responses to Arsenic Stress
Marína Maglovski 1  
,  
Zuzana Gerši 2  
,  
Ľubomír Rybanský 3  
,  
Monika Bardáčová 2  
,  
Jana Moravčíková 4  
,  
Marek Bujdoš 5  
,  
Anelia Dobrikova 6  
,  
Emilia Apostolova 6  
,  
Ján Kraic 4  
,  
Alžbeta Blehová 7  
,  
 
 
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1
Institute of Plant Genetics and Biotechnology, Plant Science and Biodiversity Center SAS,Nitra, Slovak Republic
2
Department of Ecochemistry and Radioecology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Ss. Cyril and Methodius in Trnava, Trnava, Slovak Republic
3
Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Constantine the Philosopher University, Nitra, Slovak Republic
4
Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Ss. Cyril and Methodius in Trnava, Trnava, Slovak Republic
5
Institute of Laboratory Research on Geomaterials, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Commenius University in Bratislava, Bratislava, Slovak Republic
6
Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria
7
Department of Plant Physiology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University in Bratislava, Bratislava, Slovak Republic
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Zuzana Gerši   

Department of Ecochemistry and Radioecology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Ss. Cyril and Methodius, J. Herdu 2, 917 01 Trnava, Slovak Republic
Online publish date: 2018-12-13
Publish date: 2019-02-18
Submission date: 2018-02-12
Final revision date: 2018-03-27
Acceptance date: 2018-03-27
 
Pol. J. Environ. Stud. 2019;28(3):1821–1829
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ABSTRACT
Arsenic is a serious soil pollutant with toxic effects on biological systems. Elevated soil concentrations may negatively affect crop production and food safety. The impact of arsenic on plants depends on many factors, including nitrogen availability. Nitrogen (N) as an essential mineral affects overall energetics of plants, while its non-optimal doses have been shown to also impact plant performance and yield, as well as tolerance to environmental constraints. The combined effects of these two factors, however, have been rarely studied. Here we investigated the impact of sublethal doses of As3+ (5 mM) on wheat plants grown in hydropony, applying a set of 8 different N concentrations spanning from starvation (0 mM N in the media) through optimum (7.5 mM N) to excessive amounts (up to 35 mM N). The results showed that the content of photosynthetic pigments varies depending on N concentration and As3+ presence. The different energetic status of plants also affected the final As uptake. Establishing nutrition conditions might be important for limiting metal(loid) uptake from soil in contaminated areas.
eISSN:2083-5906
ISSN:1230-1485