ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Mineralization Dynamics of Chlormequat Chloride (CCC) in Soils of Different Textures
Mariusz Cycoń1, Alicja Lewandowska2, Zofia Piotrowska-Seget3
 
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1Department of Microbiology and Virology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Medical University of Silesia,
Jagiellońska 4, 41-200 Sosnowiec, Poland
2Department of Ecology and Agricultural Environmental Protection, Institute of Plant Protection –
National Research Institute, Władysława Węgorka 20, 60-318 Poznań, Poland
3Department of Microbiology, University of Silesia, Jagiellońska 28, 40-032 Katowice, Poland
 
Pol. J. Environ. Stud. 2012;21(3):595–602
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ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to evaluate the mineralization rates of chlormequat chloride (CCC) in soils of different textures from measurements of 14CO2 evolution over a period of 100 days. The level of extractable and bound residual 14C in the soils at the end of the experiment was also determined. The degradation pattern of CCC was similar in all soil types and degree of its mineralization ranged from 53.4 to 55.7% over a period of 100 days. This process in all soils was described by first-order kinetics and CCC was mineralized with a similar constant rate (k) on the level of 0.029-0.034 day-1, and DT50 ranged from 67.7 days for sandy soil to 71.0 days for silt loam soil. Evaporation was not significant in the removal of CCC from soils, and the total amount of 14C-volatile organic compounds recovered at the end of the trials was similar to the background level. The level of 14C-extractable residues was low and reached the maximum value of 7.2% of the introduced radioactivity for sand and sandy loam soils. Levels of 14C-bound residues were higher in all soil types. The highest value (39%) was obtained for silt soil, while in the remaining soils it was lower and ranged from 30 to 33.5% of the introduced radioactivity. The relatively large amount of bound residues of CCC is probably connected with a strong affinity for soil components despite of its high water solubility and potential to be leached.
eISSN:2083-5906
ISSN:1230-1485