ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Impact of Salinity on Germination and Seedling Growth of Four Cool-Season Turfgrass Species and Cultivars
 
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Tekirdag Namik Kemal University, Agriculture Faculty, Field Crops Department, Tekirdag-Turke
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Ertan Ates   

Field Crops Department, Tekirdag Namik Kemal University, Agriculture Faculty, 59030, Tekirdag, Turkey
Submission date: 2021-08-30
Acceptance date: 2021-10-08
Online publication date: 2022-01-25
Publication date: 2022-03-22
 
Pol. J. Environ. Stud. 2022;31(2):1813–1821
 
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ABSTRACT
Salinity is the main environmental factor accountable for decreasing crop productivity and turf quality worldwide. This study was carried out to determine and compare the salinity (sodium chloride, NaCl) tolerance in newly developed eight cultivars of four cool-season turf grass species (perennial ryegrass, slender creeping red fescue, tall fescue and Kentucky bluegrass) at germination and seedling stage. All experiments were arranged as randomized plots design with three factors (species, cultivar and salinity level) and four replications. The obtained results showed that the seed germination of perennial ryegrass, slender creeping red fescue, tall fescue and Kentucky bluegrass cultivars were highly affected by the highest level of salinity (200 mM NaCl). Statistically significant were observed differences among NaCl levels for root fresh mass, shoot fresh and dry mass, water retention capacity, relative water content, tolerance index and K+/Na+ ratios of cultivars. Based on their tolerance index (TI), five cultivars, ‘Ringles’ perennial ryegrass, ‘Abercharm’ slender creeping red fescue, ‘Prafin’ Kentucky bluegrass, ‘Fesnova’ and ‘Golden Gate’ tall fescue demonstrated good salt tolerance. The tolerance indexes of these cultivars were supported by the K+/Na+ ratios. The cultivars ‘Ringles’, ‘Abercharm’, ‘Prafin’, ‘Fesnova’ and ‘Golden Gate’ exhibited potential salt tolerance and could compete with other cool-season turfgrass varieties regarding productivity under salt stress.
eISSN:2083-5906
ISSN:1230-1485