ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Microbiological Diversity and Biotechnological Potential of the Soil Ecosystem of a High-Mountainous Landfill
Nurzat Totubaeva 1  
,  
Zhiide Tokpaeva 1  
,  
Akjol Akjigit Uulu 1  
,  
 
 
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Department of Environmental Engineering, Kyrgyz-Turkish Manas University, Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Nurzat Totubaeva   

Kyrgyz-Turkish Manas University, Chyngyz Aitmatov avenue, 720000 Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
Online publish date: 2019-08-01
Publish date: 2019-09-17
Submission date: 2018-07-17
Final revision date: 2018-11-08
Acceptance date: 2018-11-21
 
Pol. J. Environ. Stud. 2019;28(6):4429–4435
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ABSTRACT
Strains isolated from high mountain industrial landfills have high biotechnological potential and studying their diversity is relevant. The objective of this study was to investigate the microbial diversity of oil-contaminated soils at a high mountain mine located 4000 meters above sea level, isolated and characterized by hydrocarbon-resistant bacteria and compare the degradation efficiency of two bacterial consortia. The surface layer (0-30 cm) that consists of 10440 mg/kg hydrocarbons were used for the experiment. A bacteria group of the three genera Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, and Rhodococcus dominated. Fungi Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Trichoderma were present in relatively high abundances in the samples. The study shows that the actinomycetes of the Streptomyces group of the Cinereus section are most sensitive to hydrocarbon contamination. Three superior indigenous bacteria Rhodococcus rhodococcus N1, Pseudomonas fluorescens W3, and Flavobacterium NE2 has been isolated from oilpolluted soil. The consortium composed of bacteria strains Rhodococcus rhodococcus N1, Pseudomonas fluorescens W3, and Flavobacterium NE2 is more effective than a consortium composed of bacteria strains Rhodococcus rhodococcus N1, Pseudomonas fluorescens W3 hydrocarbon removal efficiency 70% and 22.9%, respectively. These findings provide highly valuable information on the production of bacterial consortium for the remediation of oil-contaminated soil.
eISSN:2083-5906
ISSN:1230-1485